New and Refurbished Parts, and Paint, For The Rebuild



35.  Battery heat shield cleaned.  Openings on top were enlarged in the early maintenance history of the car, maybe at the first change to a modern battery.  Originally there were three smaller openings in the shield: two for the terminals, and the third, narrower by a two-thirds, providing access to the battery's six refill caps.  "Before" cleaning, frames, 4 and 10.

36.  "Before" frames, 1, 2, 3 and others.

37.  "Before" frames, 3, 13, 17 and 22.

38.   Refurbished at S.M Ignition in Jackson Heights.  Pulley painted, and housing cleaned.  "Before" frame, 33.

45.  On the left: manifold vacuum port tree, Mopar part number 3699 433.  Similar parts are listed in Mopar parts books, including the 1977 book, under different numbers.  The piece, used and cleaned up, was sold to me by Slant Six specialist Andy Wittenborn of Pleasantville, New York.  He has more!  Frames 17, 18 and 19 show other views of the original vacuum port tree that will be replaced with this piece.  On the right, coolant control EGR valve.

46.  Vintage Carter fuel pump.

47.  

48.  

49.  Upper and lower radiator hoses.

50.  Battery tray, brush painted with Rustoleum.

51.  Aspirator valve.

52.  A/C receiver/drier.

53.  Manifold and exhaust gaskets.


54.  

57.  

58.  

59.  

60.  

68.  

69.  

70.  

71.  

72.  

73.  

74.  

75.  Choke thermostat purchased from carbsonly.com (BFIC Fuel Systems), number 1232A.

76.  

77.  Parts purchased from rockauto.com (left to right in picture): right side engine mount, part number A2323; left engine mount, A2324, transmission mount, A2340.  That transmission mount is not correct for the car.  We reused the original, which had been in the car for only 12,000 miles.  Correct number at rockauto site for 904 transmission mount is A2512.  The two transmission mounts are not differentiated on the rockauto site.

78.  Flow test, pressure test, "boil out", flush, prep and paint at Tom Meek's Auto Cool Radiator Service in Hackensack, New Jersey.

79.  High torque "Mopar Chrysler Dodge" reman mini starter sold on ebay by BNR Parts in Van Nuys.  Over 1900 reviews in twelve months prior to 11/11/2016, with eleven neutrals and no negatives.

80.  Shield. Had no trace of paint and only a few small spots of rust.  :Degreased and treated with SEM Rust-Mort rust converter.

81.  

82.  

83.  Harmonic balancer/damper.  Dorman part number 594-243.  Made in Australia.

84.  Left to right: EGR vacuum reservoir, vacuum amplifier, EGR vacuum time delay solenoid.  Various hoses, to manifold vacuum, to carburetor and to coolant control EGR valve.

85.  Water valve. Paint over original brass finish.

86.  Headpipe cleaned to bare metal and painted with bbq flat black Rustoleum.  Subsequently thermal wrapped.  See frames 263 and 264 in the Reinstallation thread.

87.  OEM distributor, Mopar part number 3874276, purchased at ebay store of Old Car Parts NW, LLC.  Includes cap, part number 2642986, and rotor, part number, 1838516.

88.  Original cam (Mopar part number 3512 639) from the 1977 Super Six engine after regrinding at Oregon Cam Grinding in Vancouver, WA.; grind number 2016 (aka, cam model RV-10).  In addition to regrinding the cam lobes, Oregon Grinding repaired some wear to the fuel pump lobe.  Dan Stern, slantsixdan at slantsix.org, explains that the grind produces more lift, and more exhaust duration than intake duration, over the original.  He adds that Slant Six cams between 1971 and 1980 have the same duration on both sides, and that the previous cam design, on those cams installed between 1960-1970, have more intake duration than exhaust duration.  "The newer version is hotter", Dan says.  "It was used on two-barrel marine and export Slant Sixes starting in 1967.  Then it went into domestic one-barrel engines beginning in 1971, and into 1977-1980 Super Six two-barrel engines.  The RV-10 update is hotter still.  Basically the engine breathes better with the 2106-grind cam. It will be plenty! of cam. . . .  Mopar Slant Six exhaust manifold Cerakote brand ceramic-coated, "black satin" color option, at boneheadperformance.com in Warminster, PA.  150-mile round-trip from New York City.  Gasket surfaces of the exhaust and intake manifolds, temporarily joined as on the engine, were milled for perfect flatness by Charlie Olsen.  Also, hold-down notches were ground for uniformity.

89.  Oil pump, new oil pressure release valve, gaskets and 0-rings.  Thermostat housing.

90.  Miscellaneous parts: SR111, aftermarket starter relay (fit undetermined); alternator bracket; Por 15-coated front grille bracket.

91.  

92.  Sealed Power, .020 overbore. Made in India.

93.  Idler bracket, pulley.

94.  A/C clutch.

95.  Battery cable to ground.  Parts to fabricate positive terminal connector; must splice to original cable that has Mopar starter connector.

96.  Power steering pump.

97.  Six quarts.  Brand recommended by Oregon Cam.  Drain and replace with premium racing oil after "a couple of hundred miles".  89 octane fuel, 93 octane if necessary.

98.  Breather tube and fuel line.

99.  Wire and terminal connector for fabricating a positive battery cable.  Volaré schematic indicates three leads from the connector: to the starter motor, 6 gauge; to the master circuit, 8 gauge; and to the oil pressure light, 14 gauge.  The connector, a "Fusion" brand item sold by Del City, is pre-loaded with solder.

100.  

101.  Used 35-second EGR time-delay switch.  Stamped number, 4111179.  Purchased from Dodge Truck Parts in Oregon.  1977 Parts Book indicates stamped number would be, 3874310.

102.